Category Archives: donate

Fundraising Update – $47,000 Raised – Almost There

Donations to the Cycle for Sickle Cell Campaign to raise money for the Sickle Cell Foundation of Tanzania to establish a day treatment centre, have continued to come in over the last couple of weeks since the end of the Tour d’Afrique.

A corporate donor, who wishes to remain anonymous, has just donated $15,000 to the campaign. This brings our total raised to almost $47,000. We don’t have far to go now.

The Sickle Cell Foundation of Tanzania has now identified a site for the day treatment centre. The money raised to date now makes it possible to begin negotiations. Exciting times.

The Foundation is planning to hold a press conference on World Sickle Cell Day, June 19, to continue to raise awareness. This would be a great day to hit our target.

Thanks  to everyone who has contributed!

Alan

To contribute

Click on the Sickle Cell logo under ‘donate here’ – this will take you to paypal

Go into your paypal account

Choose ‘send money’

Enter my email address: alan@taylerknight.co.uk

Tick ‘I’m sending money to family or friends’

Click continue

And . . . still accpeting donations

To make a donation to the Sickle Cell Foundation of Tanzania and Cycle for Sickle Cell

Click on the Sickle logo under ‘donate here’ – this will take you to paypal

Go into your paypal account

Choose ‘send money’

Enter my email address: alan@taylerknight.co.uk

Tick ‘I’m sending money to family or friends’

Click continue

Cheers,

Alan

Please donate if you can

The link at the ‘Donate Here’ logo to the left now works. Please use it if  you are able.

Thanks

I have updated the ‘Donate Here’ logo to the left to go directly to paypal

New way to make donations

I have just found out that if you have a paypal account you can make a donation directly to my paypal account (I am slowly catching up to the 21st century).

To make a donation to the Sickle Cell Foundation of Tanzania and Cycle for Sickle Cell

Go into your paypal account

Choose ‘send money’

Enter my email address: alan@taylerknight.co.uk

Tick ‘I’m sending money to family or friends’

Click continue

Cheers,Alan

 

Fundraising update

DSC_9894

On May 15th we held a corporate fundraising event for Cycle for Sickle Cell at the Sea Cliff Hotel in Dar es Salaam. Six corporate teams entered 5 man teams in a series a cycling competitions to win prizes donated by sponsors. We raised over 13 million shillings on the night and have now raised over $US31,000 towards our goal of $US50,000 to establish the day treatment centre for the Sickle Cell Foundation of Tanzania.

Thanks everyone who came, participated and donated

!SCFM logo

Desert Rats

Day 3 – 136 km

Start – Desert by the pipeline

Finish – Desert between mountains and the Red Sea

After using the shovel and having some milk, honey and porridge for breakfast, it was back on the road. Yesterday’s tailwind had picked it up a notch. We now had a very strong tail wind. Nobody complained.

Lunch is usually about half way along the day’s route. The food truck heads out early and sets up somewhere convenient on the side of the road. We got to the 71km mark and lunch about 9:30 – or about breakfast time for many people. But we eat and then we eat some more, no matter what time it is. I finished the day’s riding by 11:40 after about 4 hours of riding.

But the wind that made the riding fast made camp chaotic. Tents were flying all over the place. It took me over an hour and three attempts to get mine up and secure. But once up it held its spot. John Chevis lost his completely and now has to find a new tent somewhere. JJ gave up on the tent, dug a hole in the sand and slept in the open.

I don’t know if anyone remembers an old television show called ‘Desert Rats’ about a bunch of 2nd WW soldiers fighting in the desert but it kind of felt like that. Vince, a Kiwi who in real life is an engineer on the inter-island ferry in New Zealand, was typical: kaki shorts, hiking boots, no shirt, his race button on a lanyard around his neck like dog tags, a hat with one of those handkerchief-like things trailing out the back. People wore sand goggles. Sand was in everything. The police were in their pickups around the perimeter of the camp. They had the guns.

Don’t forget to donate to the Sickle Cell Foundation of Tanzania.

ChipIn: Sickle Cell Foundation of Tanzania

Please Support the Sickle Cell Foundation of Tanzania

SCFM logoAt 5:30am tomorrow morning 56 riders from around the world will gather to make final preparations for the 2013 Tour d’Afrique. At 7:00am we will move from the Cataract Pyramids Resort, where we have been staying for the last week, to the Pyramids of Giza, where the official starting ceremony will take place. At 8:00am we will be cycling!

This is the 11th annual Cairo to Cape Town race and expedition. It covers almost 12,000 km and ten countries in 121 days (97 cycling days, 24 rest days), or an average of close to 125 km a day. Over 430 riders completed the Tour in its first 10 years.

I am riding to raise money for the Sickle Cell Foundation of Tanzania (click on SCFT on the top menu bar for more information).  The aim is to raise US$50,000 to establish a day treatment centre.

Please show your support for the Foundation, as we start the race, by making a donation.

And please share this with your friends and colleagues. Send them an email, suggest they follow the blog, encourage them to make a donation and make comments.

Cheers,

Alan

Midan Tahrir

2012-12-29 14.15.35We are off to Luxor on the sleeper train tonight. For the last three days we have played tourist in Cairo. On Friday we spent most of the day at the Egyptian Museum, a massive jumble of some 250,000 artifacts at the north end of Midan Tahrir. It could use some curating and a deep clean but the collection is impressive. Also, the Tutenchamun exhibition is in residence. We then wandered back into Zamalek looking for an internet café and some dinner. We ended up in a place called Arabica, where you can see that there is a literary and cultural life here. Yesterday we followed some of the traces of the Jan 25 revolution – in and out of Madin Tahrir and around the neighborhood then down to Abdeen.  The tent city is still very much in place. The old party headquarters is still a burnt out shell. All streets leading south out of the square are still blocked by massive concrete blocks. There is some great graffiti (see photo). Half the shops are boarded up and battered. The Pizza Hut just off the square has reopened but the McDonalds is still boarded up and closed. It has taken a massive hit. There is a real Mad Max feel about the place, as if it is about to slide off the edge. Today, we took the motorway out of the city to go to Giza to see the Pyramids. After crossing the Nile we passed mile after mile of ghost-like, half built apartment blocks. Then big piles of rubbish, some burning, began to fill the outside lane of the motorway, before it abruptly ended – like a Mad Max car-chase where the bad guy drives off the end of an elevated road under construction.  The contradiction is that while the fabric of the built environment is unraveling in many places (not as badly where the rich live of course), there is a contrasting sense of civil society re-establishing itself – rather than unraveling in tandem.  The weather here is mild and very pleasant. There should be lots of tourists. But there aren’t. So the touts and hawkers are desperate and even more competitive than usual. One taxi driver wanted an exorbitant rate we were unwilling to pay. But instead of turning his back and telling us to fuck off he laughed and pointed us to the Metro, which we then took. In spite of the anxiety we have sensed in most people we have met there has almost always been an underlying sense of kindness. They want to help. They want things to change. Somehow they seem to have hope.

It’s a great season to think of others.

So please think of the Sickle Cell Foundation of Tanzania this Christmas.

ChipIn: Sickle Cell Foundation of Tanzania

Cairo day 1

DCIM100GOPROAt 4:00am the storm-trooper-trolley-dollies turned all on the lights, marched down the aisle smashing down the tray tables and snapping ‘breakfast time’ in several languages. I have been woken up in more pleasant ways. Out the window I could just make out the Nile in the dark. We were getting close to Cairo. At 5:20 we landed and half an hour later we were waiting for our luggage. The 737 from Dar to Cairo was full of people going on the Haj or to other places further east. (I noticed a couple of guys with Halliburton backpacks on their way to Bagdad. According to the writing on the backpacks, Halliburton was winner of the 2011 quality service provider award. I guess waterboarding is a recognised service these days. At least they were probably not bothered by the 4am wakeup. Used to it – or inflicting it.) Since most people on the plane were connecting to other flights there were only five or six of us waiting to collect bags. It still took an hour. But everything arrived intact.

After we had checked into the hotel I went and found a taxi to start the process of getting my Ethiopian and Sudanese visas. It took about an hour and half to find the Ethiopian Embassy. They had moved to a new building. And it took a while to find somebody who knew where the new place was. But we finally find it and the process was very easy and civilized. I filled in a form, attached a photo the TdA letter and $30 and handed it to a guy sitting behind a big desk. He asked a few questions and told me to come back at 2pm. I did and now have the visa. The Sudanese visa looks like it will be a bit more of a scramble. I went to the Sudanese embassy in Garden City, a bizarre place that look s like the side entrance to city prison. There is a small, glassless window about 18 inches square with three 1-½ inch diameter stainless steel bars crossing it. You had to attract the attention of and then talk to somebody through this. Turns out the Garden City Embassy is closing and no longer in business. I eventually found out that the new embassy will open for business on January 2 in al Dokki. OK. We wait.

By now it was mid afternoon. After a short nap we went to the north end of Zamalek to a café called Maison Thomas, est. 1922 for dinner. Good pizza, no beer. A real bit of French Riviera circa 1935. Lovely architecture, ambiance and food.  Then home for a good long sleep.

It’s a great season to think of others.

So please think of the Sickle Cell Foundation of Tanzania this Christmas.

ChipIn: Sickle Cell Foundation of Tanzania